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The antibiotic that is active against drug-resistant tuberculosis:

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The antibiotic that is active against drug-resistant tuberculosis: 
A naturally occurring antibiotic called kanglemycin A is effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, even in drug-resistant strains, according to an international team of researchers who used chemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography to show how the compound maintains its activity.  The compound, kanglemycin A, is related to the antibiotic rifampicin, according to Katsuhiko Murakami, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State and one of leaders of the project. "Rifampicin is already part of the cocktail of antibiotics used to treat tuberculosis, but many strains of the tuberculosis-causing bacteria have developed resistance to it," Murakami said. "Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death by infectious disease worldwide," said Murakami. "Development of rifampicin resistance in M. tuberculosis has made treatme…

New Microbes:

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New Microbes:

New species of microbes have been discovered by the researchers. Here are a couple of the new species that have been found and the spots they've been found.
Other types of organism have been found in Tunisia. The organism, which analysts named Penicillium tunisiense, was found on an apple obtained at an open market. Organisms in the family Penicillium can make natural product spoil and, if consumed, might be harmful.
Another, Gram-positive types of microorganisms have been found on an auto cooling framework. Nocaridiodes currus was found by analysts in Korea. In China, another type of Clostridium has been found in dairy animals fertilizer. The microorganisms, named Clostridium bovifaecis, is currently one of more than 100 species of microscopic organisms that can change over carbon dioxide into vitality.
Two new types of airborne microorganisms have been found in Beijing. Roseomonas globiformis, a dark pink bacterium was found on a dim day in the city and Sphingomona…

E.coli in poultry farm may cause urinary infections in Humans

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E.coli in poultry farm may cause urinary infections in Humans: "Before, we could state that E. coli from individuals and poultry were identified with each other, however with this examination, we can all the more unquestionably say that the E. coli went from poultry to individuals and not the other way around," Dr. Price, the executive of the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, said in an official statement. More than 80 percent of urinary tract diseases are caused by E. coli, but only a few strains are responsible for most of the serious infections, which include the kidneys or blood. E. coli ST131 travel from the bladder to the blood and kills a large number of individuals in the U.S. every year. Past investigations had shown that retail meat was not a source. In any case, analysts trust those investigations were too barely engaged. Working with GWU's Translational Genomics Research Insti…

How one bacterium inhibits predators with poison:

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How one bacterium inhibits predators with poison:
Microbiologists in South Korea report that the bacterium Chromobacterium piscinae produce cyanide when under attack from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, a microbial predator found in streams and soils that ingests its prey from the top to bottom. Scientists found that the prey delivered levels of cyanide sufficiently high to hinder, but not kill, the B. bacteriovorus HD100. Examinations demonstrated that C. piscinae secrete the defensive cyanide in a nutrient-rich broth. In a medium without supplements, it didn't secrete the cyanide and was consumed. The scientists suspect that the microorganisms likely uses some ingredients in the broth to secrete the cyanide. That perception suggests that microscopic organisms' defenses may depend on location-- and, more generally, that microorganism may harbor defensive components that are activated in a suitable environment, but not in others. To test whether cyanide alone was dependabl…

Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Combating a Multidrug-Resistant Organism

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Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Combating a Multidrug-Resistant Organism:
The worldwide spread of anti-toxin resistant sexually transmitted diseases (STD) has received increased consideration in the course of recent years from health institutes including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this post we will give a background marked by multidrug-safe Neisseria gonorrhoeae taken after by a depiction of the test techniques clinical labs are utilizing to decide the antimicrobial susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae isolates. About Gonorrhea Gonorrhea is a worldwide widespread disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae, a Gram-negative bacterium. As per CDC, roughly 470,000 new gonorrheal diseases were accounted for. Notwithstanding, on the grounds that numerous cases are asymptomatic, and consequently unreported, it is evaluated that there are roughly 820,000 new cases every year. Furthermore, it is assessed that 246,000 of these cases convey some …

Digesting the Indigestible

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Move over Silicon Valley, the next big thing is microscopic! Microbes are taking over the biotech industry, contributing their unique characteristics toward a diverse array of applications, technologies and new startup ventures. From influencing personalized medicine, improving agriculture and degrading previously undegradable plastics to bioproduction of fuels and 3D printing materials, microbes have infiltrated a slew of industries. No doubt about it, microbiology is the technology buzzword of 2018.
As global plastic waste increases, science turns to specialized microbes to degrade previously non-degradable plastics. A bacterial species found growing in a plastic recycling plant, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, exhibits an incredible and rarely seen ability to use the common plastic, PET, as its major energy source.
While there are 7 official codes to distinguish between plastics, set by the Society of Plastic Industries, there really are only 2 types that regularly get recycled: polyeth…

A new and promising class of chemical compounds has major potential for treating Zika virus and respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. The next step is to develop a drug.

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A new and promising class of chemical compounds has major potential for treating Zika virus and respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. The next step is to develop a drug...
Another and promising class of synthetic mixes has the noteworthy potential for treating Zika disease and respiratory syncytial infection, or RSV, according to another examination by University of Alberta scientists. The accompanying stage is to develop a medication. "This is both a wonderful scientific discovery and something that can possibly emphatically influence worldwide wellbeing as well as the economy of Canada," said Fred West, professor in the Department of Chemistry who led the new discovery along with David Marchant. The compound is alike isatisine A which is an antiviral compound usually found in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Hobman is a professor of cell biology and a specialist in the Zika virus, a pathogen that can cause a se…